Annual Campaign

#griefcan'twait

Raised to date: $7,690.00

The Campbell River Hospice Society’s 1st Annual Campaign goal is to raise $75,000. These funds are critical so that we can meet the growing need for service in our community and allow us to respond quickly.

 

These funds will also help us implement a Sudden Loss Workshop which will provide the essential tools to help the families stay together and continue to support each other through their tragic loss.

There are times we may find ourselves thinking; What if something happened to my child, my partner or a loved one - what would I do? The answer is, you would reach out to the Campbell River Hospice Society so we can encircle you with caring and compassionate support.

The sudden loss of a loved one, whether it’s by suicide, overdose, a health issue or an accident can have a devastating effect on the family, quickly tearing them apart and becoming isolated from each other. An unexpected loss takes away the opportunity of time to adjust and to say good-bye to the one they love.  

When a family experiences a sudden loss, it can change the family for life. They often struggle with how to support each other since everyone grieves in a different way. Depending on the situation they can experience many complicated feelings such as anger, shame and guilt. They will often suffer a lack of self-esteem and shattered self-worth.

Individuals often withdraw from social contacts and become isolated. The anger the survivors feel can become directed towards each other in their family unit and with friends and caregivers. Genuine sorrow is pushed aside making it difficult for healthy expressions of loss and acknowledging the need for treatment. Unless the survivor reaches a state of acceptance and peace, this loss will continue to disrupt their lives in many ways.

All donations of $20 or more will receive a tax receipt. If you make your donation online you will receive your tax receipt immediately by email. Please be sure to check your spam folder. If you make your donation by mail, you will receive your tax receipt by mail. 

By Mail: Campbell River Hospice Society, 440 Evergreen Road Campbell River B.C. V9W 0C7

More About the Campaign

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Our Team
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Mayor Andy Adams
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Hospice Build Team

The Campbell River Hospice Society (CRHS) has been providing compassionate care to those affected by grief or those facing end-of-life for the past 32 years...


We continue providing our vital services because of the generous support of many caring and supportive individuals living in Campbell River and surrounding areas. Our financial support comes from 25% government, 42% Second to None Thrift Store and most importantly, 33% community support through our annual fundraising efforts.

Throughout this past year, we have been focused on identifying and filling gaps of services associated with grief and loss in our communities from Black Creek to Gold River. Due to the support of local community events such as Cycle of Life-Soul Cyclers, 100 Women Who Care, Ocean Pacific Auction, Dave Rennie Memorial Golf Tournament and Donations from the Community, we were able to increase counselling and hire an Art Therapist/Counsellor. This was an exceptional start to helping more people in the community, including young children and our youth.

Our Society is operated by 8% staff and 92% volunteers. Because of the completion of our new building and our dedicated volunteers who graciously contribute their expertise and talents, we are equipped to implement new services. However, we now need the funding to make it a reality.

The Goal:

At Hospice, we know grief can’t wait or be put on hold. Over the past year, we quickly recognized the need to provide a program tailored specifically to those affected by sudden loss, suicide and drug overdose. We must implement a program for our survivors who are left behind.

Sudden death can isolate survivors from their family, friends and community. There is still a powerful stigma that affects people who have recently lost someone through suicide. They are at an increased risk of thinking about it, planning or attempting suicide themselves.

We want to help the survivors of sudden death get through their devastating grief and loss by providing practical tools they can utilize. Through education and support, we can help to empower families to manage their grief in a healthy, safe and meaningful way. To make this dream a reality and to continue our current services, we need to raise $75,000 by December 31, 2019.

We ask that you consider supporting the campaign over the holiday season.

Louise Daviduck

Executive Director, Campbell River Hospice Society





“Hospice Care is an integral part of our community. Respecting and supporting those who are experiencing loss...


and who are dying is one of the most honorable things our society can provide to one another. With the current epidemic of drug overdose and suicide, we need to collectively work together to reduce the impact in our community and support those survivors affected by these devastating losses. I encourage you to support the increase of Hospice care as it is an integral part of our community”.

Andy Adams

Mayor of the City of Campbell River





“Hospice Care is an integral part of our community. Respecting and supporting those who are experiencing loss...


and who are dying is one of the most honorable things our society can provide to one another. With the current epidemic of drug overdose and suicide, we need to collectively work together to reduce the impact in our community and support those survivors affected by these devastating losses. I encourage you to support the increase of Hospice care as it is an integral part of our community”.

Andy Adams

Mayor of the City of Campbell River





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Campbell River Hospice Board of Directors
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Garth Sheane, Board Advisor
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Geri Arkell, Board Chair

The Board’s primary role is to determine the Vision for Hospice and then delegate responsibility to the Executive Director to submit plans


to implement the Vision. The Board’s primary role is to determine the Vision for Hospice and then delegate responsibility to the Executive Director to submit plans to implement the Vision. Over the past two and half years, I have been privileged to assist the Hospice Board to strengthen its role in this regard.

It is truly rewarding for me to witness the Board's growth in confidence and ability, especially in the past year, as these changes have come into practice. With this Board’s leadership, the Hospice Society has become a valued partner in the network of care providers in our community.

Garth Sheane, CRHS Board Advisor





When I met Donna, both of us were in our early teens. We married at a young age and worked together to build a loving family, blessed with a daughter and son...


and now three beautiful grandchildren.

Donna had started feeling poorly, which became a long and drawn out journey, traveling from doctor to doctor to find out what was wrong. It was very difficult not knowing the cause of the problem that took a toll on both of us. Eventually Donna was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. The doctor told us this is a terminal illness. Donna’s health was in a steady decline, but she might be a candidate for a lung transplant. We remember that day clearly. After the diagnosis from the doctor, we walked out of his office feeling shock, confusion and disbelief. Thus, we started our journey through the disease of Pulmonary Fibrosis and trying to get approved for a double lung transplant with endless trips to doctors, hospitals and tests and Donna's rapidly declining health.

In a search for added support, I walked in the door of the Hospice Society, not knowing for sure what they could do but I was desperate for help. I wanted to be strong for Donna but I was finding myself sinking deeper by the day. Walking into Hospice was comforting. I quickly learned that I had came to the right place. They encouraged me to begin utilizing some of their holistic relaxation services to help me relax and allow my mind to rest. I took advantage of healing touch, reiki and reflexology. Through Hospice, Donna was able to receive reiki and spiritual support while in hospital. Looking back, it was obvious that I was struggling as I found out later -- I kept coming to my appointments on the wrong day but they kindly found a way to squeeze me in when I arrived. They understood the state I was in and were very gracious. I then began art therapy which was a key component to being able to cope with the situation. Art therapy allowed me to talk about anything, even things I couldn’t talk to Donna or other family about. I was able to express myself more easily using the Art Therapy method. I found solace, which helped me be stronger for Donna. As time went by, Donna’s health continued to decline and we thought we would lose her -- our lives became very difficult. I continued art therapy but came to a point that I felt I could no longer draw. Kathryn asked if she could draw something for me. She made me a drawing of a badge on a piece of paper. This was a symbol to remind me of my inner strength, to take care of myself and to remember I’m not alone. I keep this small piece of paper in my wallet, which I take it out at times when life becomes particularly difficult – which was often during our journey. (See photo). This paper has become worn but remains a special reminder of my inner strength and helped me face each day. Then on September 24, 2018, we got a phone call – they found a transplant for Donna! I had to call the Hospice staff to let them all know it was happening. They were overjoyed and cheered us on, the spiritual care volunteer came to visit Donna in the hospital and they watched the helicopter take off to Vancouver.This was just over a year ago and Donna is doing well. In fact, she was able to attend the Dave Rennie Memorial Golf Tournament this year. It was a profound moment for all of us. I will forever be grateful for Hospice staff and volunteers.

Frank Mayell - Hospice Client





The Campbell River Hospice Society (CRHS) has been providing compassionate care to those affected by grief or those facing end-of-life for the past 32 years...


We continue providing our vital services because of the generous support of many caring and supportive individuals living in Campbell River and surrounding areas. Our financial support comes from 25% government, 42% Second to None Thrift Store and most importantly, 33% community support through our annual fundraising efforts.

Throughout this past year, we have been focused on identifying and filling gaps of services associated with grief and loss in our communities from Black Creek to Gold River. Due to the support of local community events such as Cycle of Life-Soul Cyclers, 100 Women Who Care, Ocean Pacific Auction, Dave Rennie Memorial Golf Tournament and Donations from the Community, we were able to increase counselling and hire an Art Therapist/Counsellor. This was an exceptional start to helping more people in the community, including young children and our youth.

Our Society is operated by 8% staff and 92% volunteers. Because of the completion of our new building and our dedicated volunteers who graciously contribute their expertise and talents, we are equipped to implement new services. However, we now need the funding to make it a reality.

The Goal:

At Hospice, we know grief can’t wait or be put on hold. Over the past year, we quickly recognized the need to provide a program tailored specifically to those affected by sudden loss, suicide and drug overdose. We must implement a program for our survivors who are left behind.

Sudden death can isolate survivors from their family, friends and community. There is still a powerful stigma that affects people who have recently lost someone through suicide. They are at an increased risk of thinking about it, planning or attempting suicide themselves.

We want to help the survivors of sudden death get through their devastating grief and loss by providing practical tools they can utilize. Through education and support, we can help to empower families to manage their grief in a healthy, safe and meaningful way. To make this dream a reality and to continue our current services, we need to raise $75,000 by December 31, 2019.

We ask that you consider supporting the campaign over the holiday season.

Louise Daviduck

Executive Director, Campbell River Hospice Society





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Dr. Bruce Wood, Board Member
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Dr. Helen Garson, Board Vice Chair
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Kathryn Schmidt, MA, CCC
Art Therapist & Counsellor

Art therapy is a form of therapy that values creativity as a path towards healing and a means towards gaining a deeper understanding of the self...


It goes beyond words and helps the individual express themselves in a different way. Artistic expression can be beneficial to anyone regardless of their artistic skill since the focus is on process and not product. Art Therapy at Hospice provides a safe space to process and express any feelings surrounding grief and loss. Making art can also produce feelings of control and accomplishment during a time when the person may feel overwhelmed or a lack of control. Making art in a therapeutic setting can help provide comfort, exploration and meaning surrounding death and dying.

Since the grieving process is unique to each individual, we provide a variety of services to help meet this need. Art therapy is one option for people to help express and work through their grief.

Kathryn Schmidt, MA, CCC

Hospice Art Therapist & Counsellor





Art therapy is a form of therapy that values creativity as a path towards healing and a means towards gaining a deeper understanding of the self...


It goes beyond words and helps the individual express themselves in a different way. Artistic expression can be beneficial to anyone regardless of their artistic skill since the focus is on process and not product. Art Therapy at Hospice provides a safe space to process and express any feelings surrounding grief and loss. Making art can also produce feelings of control and accomplishment during a time when the person may feel overwhelmed or a lack of control. Making art in a therapeutic setting can help provide comfort, exploration and meaning surrounding death and dying.

Since the grieving process is unique to each individual, we provide a variety of services to help meet this need. Art therapy is one option for people to help express and work through their grief.

Kathryn Schmidt, MA, CCC

Hospice Art Therapist & Counsellor





“Hospice Care is an integral part of our community. Respecting and supporting those who are experiencing loss...


and who are dying is one of the most honorable things our society can provide to one another. With the current epidemic of drug overdose and suicide, we need to collectively work together to reduce the impact in our community and support those survivors affected by these devastating losses. I encourage you to support the increase of Hospice care as it is an integral part of our community”.

Andy Adams

Mayor of the City of Campbell River





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Leslie Haynes-Hodgins  M.S.W., R.S.W.

Clinical Client Coordinator

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Jo-Anne Lamoureux, M.A
Hospice Registered Clinical Counsellor
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Netta Huffman – Hospice Client

“Hospice Care is an integral part of our community. Respecting and supporting those who are experiencing loss...


and who are dying is one of the most honorable things our society can provide to one another. With the current epidemic of drug overdose and suicide, we need to collectively work together to reduce the impact in our community and support those survivors affected by these devastating losses. I encourage you to support the increase of Hospice care as it is an integral part of our community”.

Andy Adams

Mayor of the City of Campbell River





Art therapy is a form of therapy that values creativity as a path towards healing and a means towards gaining a deeper understanding of the self...


It goes beyond words and helps the individual express themselves in a different way. Artistic expression can be beneficial to anyone regardless of their artistic skill since the focus is on process and not product. Art Therapy at Hospice provides a safe space to process and express any feelings surrounding grief and loss. Making art can also produce feelings of control and accomplishment during a time when the person may feel overwhelmed or a lack of control. Making art in a therapeutic setting can help provide comfort, exploration and meaning surrounding death and dying.

Since the grieving process is unique to each individual, we provide a variety of services to help meet this need. Art therapy is one option for people to help express and work through their grief.

Kathryn Schmidt, MA, CCC

Hospice Art Therapist & Counsellor





When I met Donna, both of us were in our early teens. We married at a young age and worked together to build a loving family, blessed with a daughter and son...


and now three beautiful grandchildren.

Donna had started feeling poorly, which became a long and drawn out journey, traveling from doctor to doctor to find out what was wrong. It was very difficult not knowing the cause of the problem that took a toll on both of us. Eventually Donna was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. The doctor told us this is a terminal illness. Donna’s health was in a steady decline, but she might be a candidate for a lung transplant. We remember that day clearly. After the diagnosis from the doctor, we walked out of his office feeling shock, confusion and disbelief. Thus, we started our journey through the disease of Pulmonary Fibrosis and trying to get approved for a double lung transplant with endless trips to doctors, hospitals and tests and Donna's rapidly declining health.

In a search for added support, I walked in the door of the Hospice Society, not knowing for sure what they could do but I was desperate for help. I wanted to be strong for Donna but I was finding myself sinking deeper by the day. Walking into Hospice was comforting. I quickly learned that I had came to the right place. They encouraged me to begin utilizing some of their holistic relaxation services to help me relax and allow my mind to rest. I took advantage of healing touch, reiki and reflexology. Through Hospice, Donna was able to receive reiki and spiritual support while in hospital. Looking back, it was obvious that I was struggling as I found out later -- I kept coming to my appointments on the wrong day but they kindly found a way to squeeze me in when I arrived. They understood the state I was in and were very gracious. I then began art therapy which was a key component to being able to cope with the situation. Art therapy allowed me to talk about anything, even things I couldn’t talk to Donna or other family about. I was able to express myself more easily using the Art Therapy method. I found solace, which helped me be stronger for Donna. As time went by, Donna’s health continued to decline and we thought we would lose her -- our lives became very difficult. I continued art therapy but came to a point that I felt I could no longer draw. Kathryn asked if she could draw something for me. She made me a drawing of a badge on a piece of paper. This was a symbol to remind me of my inner strength, to take care of myself and to remember I’m not alone. I keep this small piece of paper in my wallet, which I take it out at times when life becomes particularly difficult – which was often during our journey. (See photo). This paper has become worn but remains a special reminder of my inner strength and helped me face each day. Then on September 24, 2018, we got a phone call – they found a transplant for Donna! I had to call the Hospice staff to let them all know it was happening. They were overjoyed and cheered us on, the spiritual care volunteer came to visit Donna in the hospital and they watched the helicopter take off to Vancouver.This was just over a year ago and Donna is doing well. In fact, she was able to attend the Dave Rennie Memorial Golf Tournament this year. It was a profound moment for all of us. I will forever be grateful for Hospice staff and volunteers.

Frank Mayell - Hospice Client





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Kelly Fisher, Hospice Volunteer
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Frank Mayell,
Hospice Client
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Tony Coon & Leslie Palmer-Coon, Legacy Donors

I've been involved with Hospice since 2016 as a Volunteer Hospital Visitor and Companion. Both were very eye-opening...


I experienced the profound loss of my father at the young age of 10. Unfortunately, my mother was not equipped to deal with her own grief, let alone her children’s. This experience is what drove me to become a Hospice volunteer. I want to be there for those who need help through their journey of grief and loss.

To become further involved with Hospice, I participated in the Cycle of Life Tour for the first time in 2017 which is a fundraiser for Hospices on Vancouver Island. I completed the ride on my own and raised just over $3,000.00. The next year, I inspired 9 more riders to join a team that we named the Campbell River Soul Cyclers. We raised over $20,000 and in turn did it again in 2019! Within three years, the Soul Cyclers have raised over $51,000.00 for our Hospice. I had no idea how this would take off. I am so proud!

I also volunteer as a facilitator for the Hospice Grief Support group which is a safe and confidential haven for people to express their feelings. One important part of my volunteer role is to remember everyone needs to be listened to, no matter what it is they are feeling and what they need to say.

I feel that volunteering and fundraising for Hospice is a privilege. I am serving my community. I like that I can support someone on their grief journey. I would encourage others to join and find their place in Hospice because it is a tremendous asset to our community.

Kelly Fisher, Hospice Volunteer





When I met Donna, both of us were in our early teens. We married at a young age and worked together to build a loving family, blessed with a daughter and son...


and now three beautiful grandchildren.

Donna had started feeling poorly, which became a long and drawn out journey, traveling from doctor to doctor to find out what was wrong. It was very difficult not knowing the cause of the problem that took a toll on both of us. Eventually Donna was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis. The doctor told us this is a terminal illness. Donna’s health was in a steady decline, but she might be a candidate for a lung transplant. We remember that day clearly. After the diagnosis from the doctor, we walked out of his office feeling shock, confusion and disbelief. Thus, we started our journey through the disease of Pulmonary Fibrosis and trying to get approved for a double lung transplant with endless trips to doctors, hospitals and tests and Donna's rapidly declining health.

In a search for added support, I walked in the door of the Hospice Society, not knowing for sure what they could do but I was desperate for help. I wanted to be strong for Donna but I was finding myself sinking deeper by the day. Walking into Hospice was comforting. I quickly learned that I had came to the right place. They encouraged me to begin utilizing some of their holistic relaxation services to help me relax and allow my mind to rest. I took advantage of healing touch, reiki and reflexology. Through Hospice, Donna was able to receive reiki and spiritual support while in hospital. Looking back, it was obvious that I was struggling as I found out later -- I kept coming to my appointments on the wrong day but they kindly found a way to squeeze me in when I arrived. They understood the state I was in and were very gracious. I then began art therapy which was a key component to being able to cope with the situation. Art therapy allowed me to talk about anything, even things I couldn’t talk to Donna or other family about. I was able to express myself more easily using the Art Therapy method. I found solace, which helped me be stronger for Donna. As time went by, Donna’s health continued to decline and we thought we would lose her -- our lives became very difficult. I continued art therapy but came to a point that I felt I could no longer draw. Kathryn asked if she could draw something for me. She made me a drawing of a badge on a piece of paper. This was a symbol to remind me of my inner strength, to take care of myself and to remember I’m not alone. I keep this small piece of paper in my wallet, which I take it out at times when life becomes particularly difficult – which was often during our journey. (See photo). This paper has become worn but remains a special reminder of my inner strength and helped me face each day. Then on September 24, 2018, we got a phone call – they found a transplant for Donna! I had to call the Hospice staff to let them all know it was happening. They were overjoyed and cheered us on, the spiritual care volunteer came to visit Donna in the hospital and they watched the helicopter take off to Vancouver.This was just over a year ago and Donna is doing well. In fact, she was able to attend the Dave Rennie Memorial Golf Tournament this year. It was a profound moment for all of us. I will forever be grateful for Hospice staff and volunteers.

Frank Mayell - Hospice Client





Art therapy is a form of therapy that values creativity as a path towards healing and a means towards gaining a deeper understanding of the self...


It goes beyond words and helps the individual express themselves in a different way. Artistic expression can be beneficial to anyone regardless of their artistic skill since the focus is on process and not product. Art Therapy at Hospice provides a safe space to process and express any feelings surrounding grief and loss. Making art can also produce feelings of control and accomplishment during a time when the person may feel overwhelmed or a lack of control. Making art in a therapeutic setting can help provide comfort, exploration and meaning surrounding death and dying.

Since the grieving process is unique to each individual, we provide a variety of services to help meet this need. Art therapy is one option for people to help express and work through their grief.

Kathryn Schmidt, MA, CCC

Hospice Art Therapist & Counsellor